Grip Caps

Topics related to Pre - 1898 Remington Shotguns
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AZMike
Posts: 47
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:53 am

Grip Caps

Post by AZMike » Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:08 am

I have an 1894 10 gauge BE (heavy 10 lb 4oz) that sported a nice looking grip cap. Was this done by Remington or an add on after?
The stock is a dead match for my FE comb drop plus the barrel has a center bead.
This make me think that this 10's principal use might have been live birds or clays.
If so it reassures the idea that yesteryears shooters were a rugged lot!
IMG_1361.jpg
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Researcher
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Location: Washington and Alaska

Re: Grip Caps

Post by Researcher » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:05 am

That gun has been restocked. The checkering pattern isn't right and it doesn't have the defined stock cheeks one should see on a graded Remington Hammerless Double.
BE-Grade 12-gauge stock cheeks cropped.jpg
BE-Grade 12-gauge stock cheeks cropped.jpg (222.03 KiB) Viewed 536 times
BE-Grade 12-gauge stock cheeks 02 cropped.jpg
BE-Grade 12-gauge stock cheeks 02 cropped.jpg (215.63 KiB) Viewed 536 times
Looks like whoever did it did a good job, but it is just not Remington work. That grip cap looks like the one Parker Bros. used before they went to their proprietary cap. It seems to have been a commercially available cap as I have similar caps on Tobin, Baltimore Arms Co. and Ithaca doubles. This is the grip cap Remington Arms Co. used on their full pistol grip Remington Hammerless Doubles --
100154 14 grip cap cropped.jpg
100154 14 grip cap cropped.jpg (15.43 KiB) Viewed 536 times
107252 13 cropped.jpg
107252 13 cropped.jpg (107.85 KiB) Viewed 536 times

Researcher
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Re: Grip Caps

Post by Researcher » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:15 am

That gun wasn't used in any sanctioned competitive shooting back in the day. By the time the Remington Hammerless Double was introduced in October 1894, a weight limit had been added to the Interstate Association rules and your gun had to be under eight pounds. Looking at the lists of guns used in the Grand American Handicaps (at live birds) from 1893 through 1902, one finds the great bulk of the guns used being 12-gauge and weighing 7 pounds 8 ounces to 7 pounds 15 ounces.

AZMike
Posts: 47
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:53 am

Re: Grip Caps

Post by AZMike » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:54 pm

Thanks for the information Researcher-
I would not have guessed that weight restrictions would have been so early in the games. Did the size of shotgun shells start at the same time?

Researcher
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Re: Grip Caps

Post by Researcher » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:54 pm

The heaviest shot charge allowed was 1 1/4 ounce. The ATA finally reduced the max load for trap shooting to 1 1/8 ounce in April 1940. That is probably why from the introduction of factory loaded smokeless powder shotgun shells in the early 1890s, the max payload in both factory loaded 10- and 12-gauge shells was 1 1/4 ounce. Pretty much worked to kill off the 10-gauge. While the 10-gauge had pretty much standardized at 2 7/8 inch, in those days 12-gauge paper shells could be had in the standard 2 5/8 inch length, and the extra length hulls of 2 3/4, 2 7/8, 3 and 3 1/4 inch. The longer shells didn't carry heavier loads, but had more/better wadding which many serious gun cranks considered an advantage. The "standard" 16-gauge shell was 2 9/16 inch and the "standard" 20-gauge shell was 2 1/2 inch, but longer 2 3/4, 2 7/8 and 3-inch shells could be had. The "standard" 28-gauge shell was 2 1/2 inch, but 2 7/8 inch shells were also offered. About 1906-07 our North American ammunition companies quit offering 1 1/4 ounce loads in the 2 5/8 inch 12-gauge shell, and one had to go 2 3/4 inch or longer for 1 1/4 ounce loads. The 3 1/4 inch 12-gauge cases also disappeared about that time. From their introductions in 1905 and 1908, Remington's John M. Browning designed Remington Autoloading Shotgun and John D. Pedersen designed Remington Repeating Shotgun were made for 2 3/4 inch 12-gauge shells. Interestingly, the Remington Hammerless Doubles still came with hang-tags which showed 2 5/8 inch 12-gauge shells, like this tag for a 1908 vintage KE-Grade --
KE hang tag 372340 early 1908 vintage.jpg
KE hang tag 372340 early 1908 vintage.jpg (124.77 KiB) Viewed 529 times


However, from 1907 onward Load No. X8 only came in a 2 3/4 inch hull --
1907 NITRO CLUB loads.jpeg
1907 NITRO CLUB loads.jpeg (353.94 KiB) Viewed 529 times


I've got to believe waterfowlers were hand loading heavier 10-gauge shells for the big heavy 10-gauge guns like yours, or this Ithaca --
Flues 10-gauge ad, Sept. 1915.jpg
Flues 10-gauge ad, Sept. 1915.jpg (176.4 KiB) Viewed 529 times

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