New for me!

Topics related to Pre - 1898 Remington Rifles
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cwo4uscgret
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 8:30 pm

New for me!

Post by cwo4uscgret » Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:09 pm

Hello. Long time lurker, not posting too often.

I walked into my local gun shop yesterday; just looking around. I saw an "old" rifle on his for sale rack; after an intensive negotiation - we agreed on $65.00 out the door. (actually when I asked how much the reply was $75. When I offered $65 he said sure)

I'm fairly certain its a Number 4 chambered in .32 BP. What I don't know is when it was made. Barely legible the serial number (on the bottom of the barrel) is 78639. It (obviously) needs a new stock; the breech block seems to be really loose as well.

Here are some photos of it:

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Last edited by cwo4uscgret on Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

stanforth
Posts: 144
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:56 am
Location: Oxford England

Re: New for me!

Post by stanforth » Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:22 am

Why a new stock?
From your images I would think the original one is reparable.
To repair the splits I would take the stock off, put a liberal dose of superglue in the damage and the clamp or bind it tight and allow it to set. If you were thinking of a new stock anyway you have nothing, apart from a small amount of superglue, to loose.
That gun is original, keep it that way.
You can always restore it TOMORROW but, once done you can NEVER make it original again.

Good luck.

wlw-19958
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Sep 18, 2016 7:21 pm

Re: New for me!

Post by wlw-19958 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:12 pm

Hi There,

I think "SuperGlue" is a poor choice for repairing a stock.
The best product I know of for this kind of work is Brownell's
ACRAGLAS®. I have repaired dozens of cracked stocks this
way and the cracks do not re-open. The regular (not the GEL)
is what you want. I use a hypodermic syringe to inject it into
tight areas like a crack.

If you are going to repair the stock, do it right the first time
and save yourself the aggravation.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

stanforth
Posts: 144
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:56 am
Location: Oxford England

Re: New for me!

Post by stanforth » Sat Mar 16, 2019 4:58 am

I suggested superglue because it soaks into the wood and allows and allows a woods to wood bond. It doesn't leave a residue the need for you to sand or otherwise affect the original finish.

A few weeks ago, at the range, some idiot stepped on my .22 Winchester model 1890 and snapped the stock just behind the hand. I had some Superglue in my toolbox and some gaffer tape. 20 minutes later I removed the tape and continued using the rifle. Other members of my Club couldn't believe their eyes, no sign of a break or a repair.

wlw-19958
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Sep 18, 2016 7:21 pm

Re: New for me!

Post by wlw-19958 » Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:40 am

Hi There,

Cyanoacrylates (superglue) form long chain bonds
in the presents of water (humidity from the air can
be enough). It works best in a thin layer like when
the parts have very tight fit. It has very poor adhesive
qualities if the fit is less than perfect.

The other problem with cyanoacrylates is they have
very poor shear strength.

Contrary to what you said, cyanoacrylates do leave a
residue. In fact, it is used as a finish on wood by some
pen makers (by building up successive layers and then
sanding).

Polyepoxides (a.k.a. epoxies), on the other hand form
polymers through cross-linked reaction with a co-reactant
(usually called a "hardener") and are made in a wide range
for different applications. Epoxies have better filling
qualities and they don't loose their adhesive qualities
when the fit of parts is less then perfect. Brownell's
ACRAGLAS® is specially formulated for the gunsmith
and especially good for stock repairs.

Now a fresh crack can have a perfect fit and will form
a tight bond but once a crack has been there for some
time, the fit will degrade. Wood fibers may have been
loss and dimensional changes in the pieces over time
will affect the fit. Also contamination in the crack will
have an affect on the bond. Both cyanoacrylates and
polyepoxides are affected by contamination but epoxies
are more tolerant of them than superglues.

In conclusion, I reiterate that epoxy is a better choice
for this kind of stock repair than superglue.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

admin
Site Admin
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2002 2:14 pm

Re: New for me!

Post by admin » Sun Mar 17, 2019 11:51 am

Superglue bad.

There's a paste, got it at the paint store it will remove all water stains (and color) from a stock without damaging the wood if your going to refinish it. If someone here doesn't remember it's name I'll go find it, it's in the garage somewhere...

marlinman93
Posts: 216
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2004 10:47 pm

Re: New for me!

Post by marlinman93 » Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:49 am

I also have used Superglue to bond or stabilize very tight cracks. Too tight to expand enough to get Acraglass or other thick epoxies into the crack. It does a good job in these hairline cracks, but I don't use it for larger cracks I can spread safely to get thicker epoxy into.

If you post the exact rollstamp info on the top flat of the barrel I can narrow down when it was made. Either post info, or a clear image of the rollstamp.

cwo4uscgret
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 8:30 pm

Barrel Marks

Post by cwo4uscgret » Wed Mar 20, 2019 4:33 pm

Image
Barrel Rollmark
Image
Caliber and Serial Number on the barrel

marlinman93
Posts: 216
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2004 10:47 pm

Re: New for me!

Post by marlinman93 » Wed Mar 20, 2019 4:57 pm

The "Remington Arms Co. Ilion NY" rollstamp did not start until 1889, and the No. 4 came out a year later in 1890. Your rollstamp is the earliest style used on early No.4 Rolling Blocks. Your No. 4 appears to be a solid frame, and takedowns started in 1900, so that would put your gun into the 1890-1899 range. That's a s close as I can get you.

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