New Guy and SURPRISE! I have a "ID my RB" question

Topics related to Pre - 1898 Remington Rifles
millsan1
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:22 am

Re: New Guy and SURPRISE! I have a "ID my RB" question

Post by millsan1 » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:29 am

Barrel Band marking

Proof mark? near rear of barrel on left side


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millsan1
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:22 am

Re: New Guy and SURPRISE! I have a "ID my RB" question

Post by millsan1 » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:31 am

oldremguy wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:00 pm
Here is a photo of the 1871 Patent date stamped on the lower tang of my rifle. Sorry for the poor quality of the photo it was taken about 15 years ago. I will try to take a better photo in the up coming days. It reads
PATD AUG 27th 1867
NOV 7th 1871

NYS3a.jpg

Have a Good Day,
Matt

Nothing on mine. I am intrigued by what this gun can be.
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oldremguy
Posts: 185
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 8:53 am
Location: Rochester, NY

Re: New Guy and SURPRISE! I have a "ID my RB" question

Post by oldremguy » Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:39 pm

This gun has one of the early receivers before Remington started to stamp them with the 1871 patent dates. All of the New York State rolling block rifles were made with 36" barrels and they had 3 barrel bands on the forearm. Your rifle barrel and forearm have been cut down sometime after they were sold as surplus arms.

Have a Good Day,
Matt

Dick Hosmer
Posts: 157
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 8:15 pm
Contact:

Re: New Guy and SURPRISE! I have a "ID my RB" question

Post by Dick Hosmer » Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:09 am

Aha, now that we can FINALLY see the whole thing, the crystal ball clears a bit.

I wondered why the tip fit so poorly. It is because the rifle was cut down, at some time, by "Bubba", who also left his trademark goofy front sight and wrench/vise marks on the barrel. The NYS arms were either three-band rifles or carbines, which is why that one would not have been pictured in any of the reference books. It also explains why the arm did not sell at the dealers. The fact that is has been cleaned with Naval Jelly is another serious turn-off to 98% of potential buyers.

So, the collector value is basically zero, and I'm not sure I'd want to shoot it either. "Restoring" it would be a TOTAL waste of money. The only real value would be sentimental, and that's impossible to price, but, absent any such consideration - real value at a gun show? Maybe $150. Just my opinion - others may well vary.

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