Need help identifying this rolling block..

Topics related to Pre - 1898 Remington Rifles
Enslaved87
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:12 pm

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by Enslaved87 »

More pics....................................................
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stanforth
Posts: 159
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:56 am
Location: Oxford England

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by stanforth »

8X58R Danish Krag, the calibre used in the Swedish model 1867/89 is made by 'Bertram Brass Cases' and available here in the UK. and if you can get it here you can get it anywhere. :roll:
Enslaved87
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:12 pm

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by Enslaved87 »

stanforth wrote:8X58R Danish Krag, the calibre used in the Swedish model 1867/89 is made by 'Bertram Brass Cases' and available here in the UK. and if you can get it here you can get it anywhere. :roll:

I will have to read up on hand loading, I have virtually zero experience with it.

UPDATE: Back to the first gun. I received my .43 Spanish ammo from selway armory. It fits like a glove in the chamber. I was looking for any kind of powder/pressure data for this stuff and I came up with nothing. After an email to Selway they confirmed that this stuff ia smokeless powder :oops: Precision cartridge.com is the manufacturer for whatever that is worth. Anybody ever use this stuff? I'm a little nervous about taking a breach block to the face.
stanforth
Posts: 159
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:56 am
Location: Oxford England

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by stanforth »

I will have to read up on hand loading, I have virtually zero experience with it.

UPDATE: Back to the first gun. I received my .43 Spanish ammo from selway armory. It fits like a glove in the chamber. I was looking for any kind of powder/pressure data for this stuff and I came up with nothing. After an email to Selway they confirmed that this stuff ia smokeless powder :oops: Precision cartridge.com is the manufacturer for whatever that is worth. Anybody ever use this stuff? I'm a little nervous about taking a breach block to the face.[/quote]


You will find it difficult to find loading data on this obsolete round.. HOWEVER I found this in an old copy of Cartridges of the Would.

Bullet grs Powder/ grs Muzzle velocity Muzzle energy
387 Hogdon 4198 32grs 1360 1590
375 Black powder (Fg) 1380 1590 Military load

This was originally a black powder round so, particularly if you want to experience it as it was intended, I would fill the case with Fg Black powder and compress a bullet on top.
It goes without saying that you should make sure that the gun is in sound order first.
Grump09
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2021 4:59 pm

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by Grump09 »

I have possibly a no5 in 7mm with an auto ejector?


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wlw-19958
Posts: 131
Joined: Sun Sep 18, 2016 7:21 pm

Re: Need help identifying this rolling block..

Post by wlw-19958 »

Hi There,

Are you asking for help with Identification of your No. 5?
It would have been best if you started a new thread rather
than piggy-backing off an older thread. Regardless, we will
try and help.

There are several versions of the No. 5 rolling block. It first
made its appearance in 1896. The first version is known as
the 1896 model (for obvious reasons). This model was only
made for about 10 months before the model 1897 version
came out. Both of these versions have the older "bar" type
extractor because at the time, Remington couldn't get the
rotary type extractor to work reliably with rimless cartridges.

Then, in late 1901 or early 1902, Remington got the rights
to the Daly patent which was a new type of rotary extractor
that was spring loaded and would eject the spent cartridge.
This version is usually referred to as the 1902 model (sometimes
called the 1901 because of the last patent date on the tang).

Mechanically, that was the last version but around 1910,
Remington changed the front sight to a banded front sight
and this version is referred to as the model 1910.

So, if your No. 5 ejects the cartridge, it is either a 1902 or
a 1910 model. If the front sight sits on a cylindrical band
that is slightly larger in diameter that the barrel, then it is
the 1910 model.

What caliber is yours? Most No. 5's were made in 7mm
Mauser (sometimes called Spanish Mauser) but there were
other calibers as well. I believe the 1910 models were mostly
in 8mm Lebel (made for the French government during the
early part of WWI before the US involvement).

Post pics if you want more help.

Good Luck!
Webb
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