Remington Navy Elliot's patent

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Asa
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2020 9:50 am

Remington Navy Elliot's patent

Post by Asa »

A Freind of mine came across a unique Remington Revolver. I have been researching it and have some questions that maybe you guys can answer.
What I (think) I know:
It is an "Old Model" Navy, Elliots Patent, due to the Patent date of December 17, 1861 marked on the top of the 7 3/8" barrel. It is .36 caliber, in the serial number range (160xx) to be made Aug. 1862. Serial numbers are stamped on the underside of the barrel under the loading lever (Hard to read), under the left grip panel, and the last 4 are stamped on the trigger guard tang at the rear, that tucks into the frame.
Has a cartouche on the left grip panel, appears to be a "C??", not sure if the grips are original to the gun.
It is stamped with a "J" on the left side rearward flat of the barrel, on the frame just behind the barrel, and directly above the hammer screw, as well as one on the cylinder. It has "ELIOTTS Patent" stamped on the loading lever on the part that fits into the frame.
The gun has many issues, the right grip panel has had a repair, the spur on the hammer is broke off, the cylinder appears to have been bead blasted and 3 of the chambers have been drilled all the way through (one is coming through the bolt stop), the hammer screw is broke off and it is missing the lever latch, main spring, hand and spring and the wheel that goes on the rear of the hammer and rides on the main spring.
The frame, grips, barrel and loading lever assembly are in better shape than the rest of the gun.

Questions:
Do the "J" stamping have anything to do with Military inspectors?
Would this gun be worth repairing, or should it be kept as a relic?

Very interesting gun that has been fun researching. Have always had a love for colts but this has sparked a new interest in these guns.
Thanks for any and all help.
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billt
Posts: 234
Joined: Tue Apr 22, 2003 6:42 pm

Re: Remington Navy Elliot's patent

Post by billt »

Hello,
You are correct that the “J” stampings had something to do with military inspectors. Once the revolver was completed by the manufacturer the military inspectors inspected the major components of the revolver and placed their stamp on the parts which passed inspection. Once a revolver passed inspection the principal sub inspector stamped his cartouche on the left grip panel indicating the revolver was accepted by the Ordnance Department. The cartouche on your friend’s revolver is most likely that of C. G. Curtis (CGC) who according to Don Ware stamped his cartouche on the final lot of 5000 revolvers delivered to the Ordnance Department in December of 1862 under the contract of June 1862. The serial number range of revolvers delivered on that contract were in the range of 13,500 to 20,000.
As far as repairing the gun goes it is in better than relic condition. A relic is usually a rusted hunk of metal which can be traced back to a battle field. If it were mine I would take my time looking for the parts I needed and repair it.

Bill
Asa
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2020 9:50 am

Re: Remington Navy Elliot's patent

Post by Asa »

Thanks for the info Bill.
Do you have a source for parts?
Most of what is available is for the "New Model".
Are the internal parts, such as the hand and spring, main spring and screws the same?
I learned that the hammer and trigger are different on the old and new models as well as the little wheel that is on the back of the hammer is smaller on this model.
I'm guessing the cylinder pin would have to be custom made as well as a correct cylinder without the safety notches.
Thanks for any and all help...
Asa
billt
Posts: 234
Joined: Tue Apr 22, 2003 6:42 pm

Re: Remington Navy Elliot's patent

Post by billt »

I do not have a source for parts. However if you go to the Remington Society Home page and click on Service/Parts there are several parts dealers listed. I do not know if they have any parts for Navy percussion revolvers. You also might want to pick up a copy of Don Ware’s book, Remington Army and Navy Revolvers 1861-1888. In the book he devotes one chapter Identifying Army and Navy Revolvers where he explains the differences between the models.

Good luck,

Bill
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