Ink stamped pattern numbers where's the true documentation?

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AREMINGTONSEDGE
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 8:01 pm

Ink stamped pattern numbers where's the true documentation?

Post by AREMINGTONSEDGE »

Can anyone show "legitimate Remington documentation" that explains why and when Remington ever used inked on stamp pattern numbers???? In all my search I can find nothing! Have you???

AREMINGTONSEDGE
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 8:01 pm

Re: Ink stamped pattern numbers where's the true documentati

Post by AREMINGTONSEDGE »

After research and investigation I think I have an answer to my own question and in part will provide a short explanation. In the 1930's the majority of stocks/shares of the Remington cutlery division was sold to and under the control of DuPont. During the trials and tribulations of The Great Depression beginning in Oct. 1929 when most cutlery companies were beginning to fold, forced in to selling their company or were going under in bankruptcy due to the disintegrating economy, DuPont, (who held the controlling stock shares in the company) invoked management strategies in efforts to cut production and overhead costs as financial leverage to save the Remington cutlery division from failure.
Part of the company's mandate,( aside from tremendous marketing strategies, decreasing the amount of offered production knife patterns and other cost effective measures in manufacturing) was to use appropriate "on hand stock", or "shelf" blades per pattern number requirement. In doing so the knife patterns would have the appropriate blades but could have different or various "etchings" and possibly incorrect tang stamps for the year of manufacturing that one would not commonly find on that blade pattern or in that year's tang stamp. It also was recorded that they cut down on use and eventually cease the use of "stamped" pattern numbers and went to "ink" applied pattern numbers or in some cases on the lower end knives did not use pattern numbers at all. Keep in mind that in all the efforts to cut cost Remington DuPont never cut quality, craftsmanship and held the company's level of value and integrity in highest regard with production of their cutlery and in maintaining Remington's lifetime guarantees. As Remington DuPont neared the end of the 1930's it was clear that despite financial efforts to continue manufacturing their cutlery line, the public and private economy could no longer support the once thriving knife industry and with our Nation entering in to a second major World War the cutlery division of Remington was closed and sold to PAL and Remington turned their focus on military contracts and production of said weapons and ammunition.
This becomes in turn all in all difficult for those who collect Remington cutlery from the 1920's - 1940. The production years of Remington's cutlery from 1930-1940 is particularly difficult for it is in this time frame approximately that these "cost saving' measures were implemented and as a result, in the recent past and in present conditions of market demand, many "individuals" and "craftsmen" have manipulated Remington's sometimes vague and ambiguous production years and flooded the market with fake or reproduction knives not authorized or sanctioned by Remington in order to "cash in" on the popularity and high demand in collecting Remington cutlery. In saying this, it is imperative that the Remington collector maintains a sharp, keen eye in determining original knives from the refurbished or fake knives on the market. In order to hone that keen eye the collector should read, study, research, handle, ask questions, seek other collector's opinion on Remington cutlery, all before investing in the antique/vintage Remington knife. I hope this helps and...Caveat emptor!

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