Identification Help

Topics related to Pre - 1898 Remington Rifles
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exitscott1
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:01 am

Identification Help

Post by exitscott1 » Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:20 am

I think it's a rolling block model 2 but just not sure.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Photos attached.
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marlinman93
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2004 10:47 pm

Re: Identification Help

Post by marlinman93 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 8:43 am

Yes it's a Model #2, but can't tell you much more without the barrel rollstamp. They made them for quite a few years, and changed rollstamps over the years. If you post a picture of the barrel rollstamp it will help narrow down when it was made.

exitscott1
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:01 am

Re: Identification Help

Post by exitscott1 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:37 pm

Thanks very much Marlin.

I had no idea what a roll stamp was and after doing a little googling I'm not sure where to look on this gun. Do I have to disassemble the gun?

Thanks again,

Scott

exitscott1
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:01 am

Re: Identification Help

Post by exitscott1 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:52 pm

Hey again Marlin,

After doing a little more research, it appears that the barrel stamping did not commence until 1920. If that is correct, I believe this rifle would pre-date that process. Or not.

Thanks again.

Don Kenna
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Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 12:28 am
Location: Malta, Montana
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Re: Identification Help

Post by Don Kenna » Thu Apr 18, 2019 6:44 pm

The definitive work for identifying Remington “Rolling Block” sporting rifles is “Remington Rolling Block Rifles, Carbines & Shotguns; Sporting and Target Rifles,” by Roy Marcot, Jay Lewis, et al.

I don’t have mine in front of me right now, so I may be off a year or so, but the Number 2 sporting rifle was produced from about 1872 to 1913. Features to look at for dating purposes are the sights, barrel “scroll” markings, and the stock configuration. If the barrel is marked “E. Remington and Sons,” the rifle was very probably produced before 1887. Due to a bankruptcy and change of ownership, the barrel was afterwards marked “Remington Arms Co.” I can’t provide dates from memory on the other changes, but your rifle stock’s lack of semicircular panels where the buttstock meets the rear of the frame and where the forend meets the front to the frame indicates later production. So, too, does the schnauble forend tip. The earlier ones have an iron forend cap. There were some cosmetic changes in the open rear barrel sight over the production run, with that featuring the squared-off front end being the earliest type.

I’ve sometimes heard the Remington No. 2 rifle termed “just a cheap ‘boy’s rifle’” by the uninformed. It is no such thing. It is small and light enough so that it could have been manageable by a young lad or lass, but he or she would have been a pretty well-heeled kid. The No. 2 was a very high-quality lightweight small game rifle, and its 1870s catalog price was only a bit less than a new Winchester 1873 rifle. Probably because of the No. 2’s relatively high price, Remington entered the “boy’s rifle” market with the good quality, but much less expensive, Number 4 “rolling block” about 1890.

exitscott1
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:01 am

Re: Identification Help

Post by exitscott1 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 7:11 am

Thanks so much Don.

The only markings is could find on the barrel are the .22 on the bottom and "Remington Arms Co. Ilion, N.Y. on top.

I'll have to get the book.

Pictures attached.

Thanks again.
Attachments
Rolling Block 2.jpg
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Rolling Block 1.jpg
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marlinman93
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2004 10:47 pm

Re: Identification Help

Post by marlinman93 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 8:59 am

That's what I suspected, due to the forearm style. The rollstamp is the last style used on #2's built after bankruptcy. It narrows your gun down to post 1889-1909 when production ended.

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