Pocket Knife R3424

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LVelasquez
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:44 pm

Pocket Knife R3424

Post by LVelasquez »

Good afternoon. I am having a problem finding information on a knife I picked up and was wondering if someone could help me find its history and value. I spoke with Remington but there really isn't any information they gave me that I hadn't already found on the internet which was minimal. The knife is a R3424 Slant bolster with three blades. The handle is mother of pearl with no chips or scratches. I was told by Remington that the knife is rare. They also directed me to your sight. I would like to sell this item but want to make sure I am giving a fair price as well as receiving a fair price in cash or trade. I thank you in advance for your help. Please email me @ Lvfenders4me@yahoo.com with any replies.

RemingtonFarms
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 2:54 pm

Re: Pocket Knife R3424

Post by RemingtonFarms »

You are correct that the knife has pearl handles (i.e., not pyremite/celluloid). It should have 3 blades: a pear master blade which was crocus polished and etched with the Remington trademark name; and one eachcut-off pen and pen blades, both blue glazed. The bolsters are nickel silver and liners are brass. Closed, it measures 3 3/8 inches long. The knife was manufactured in the 1921 - 1940 period. As a generalization, this particular pattern would fall within the average value range for vintage Remington pocketknives, albeit in the upper half. While it is not one of the more commonly found Remington pocketknife patterns, neither is it rare. However, it is impossible to determine the value of any knife without examining it regarding overall condition, repairs, polishing or other "restoration", and authenticity. (Some enterprising individuals take parts from multiple "parts knives" and put them together to get what are claimed to be original knives.) As with all collectibles, condition drives price and degree of condition is often in the eye of the beholder. Remington has no surviving vintage cutlery records so it is not surprising that they were unable to assist you with your inquiry. There are books which purport to provide values for vintage cutlery. But one must remember that the stated values are someone's estimate of what a piece in perfect or "mint" condition could be worth. When backing down from such figures, one must remember that price increases are exponential and not linear with increase in condition. So a knife with even very moderate use is worth only a fraction of one in so-called mint condition.

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